Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival 2012

A summer music festival hidden in the backwoods…


Yellow Pine Idaho – USA, Population 35

…Everyone is getting into the act!

23rd Annual Yellow Pine Music & Harmonica Festival - Aug. 3rd, 4th, 5th, 2012


(2011 Harmonica Contest winners posted CLICK HERE)

…Is transformed into the harmonica capital of the western world. Entering its 23rd year in 2012 (August 3-5), the Yellow Pine Music & Harmonica Festival (our new name) has grown into one of the world’s largest (and most fun!) harmonica-related events. For twenty-two years, the festival has provided musical enjoyment to thousands of people in our beautiful, rustic village of Yellow Pine situated in the Idaho backcountry.While we are still honoring prospecting pioneers who carried pocket harps into the wilderness with them, this yearly event has also evolved to include many types of music.

2012 will see the festival turn a corner… We will not be holding a harmonica contest, for which there have been fewer contestants each year for some time. Instead, we will be featuring great harmonica players and other wonderful musicians in multiple concerts in the Community Hall, as well as in the ever-popular “Crowd Pleaser” competition on the outdoor stage.We hope to welcome back many of our excellent harmonica friends in a less competitive and more creative environment that will truly showcase their varied talents. We are excited about the new format we have envisioned for the festival, and we trust that it will be stimulating to our visitors as well as working better for our village’s bottom line. Stay tuned for more information here as our 2012 planning season gets underway…The Crowd Pleaser contest will, as ever, be open to all types of entertainers and will be conducted on the free outdoor stage in the center of town. The audience will select the Crowd Pleaser winner by purchasing tickets to use as votes for their favorite act. (Encourage your talented friends to think about entering! – it’s really just a great way to perform in front of an appreciative audience.)

There will also be a street dance on Friday and Saturday nights – and, if we know musicians, any number of jam sessions going on in the woods next to town!

This is a family-oriented event with something for everyone. There will be food and craft vendors, raffles, auctions, and toe-tapping music on two stages each day!

So come, step back in time, camp in the beautiful Idaho mountains, swim at Devil’s Bathtub, fish Johnson Creek and the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River… Best of all, relax and listen to some great music, enjoy great food, interesting vendors, and meet great friends both new and old at the gateway to Idaho’s wilderness.

February 11, 2017 5:29 am

Making Music with Harmonica

The harmonica is not only associated with the blues but also with jazz, country, rock, pop, and classic music. It is known to be a free reed that is why it is categorized as aerophone and unlike other wind instruments, the harmonica is handy, inexpensive and is easy to get started on.

To begin with, you must form the correct placing of your mouth to the holes of the instrument. Be sure that your lips are moist and that they seal around the holes. Furthermore, you must breathe through the instrument to play clean notes. The way to achieve it is that you should breathe through the instrument rather than suck it. And one of the techniques used in playing harmonica is called bending. The idea of it is simple, you are just changing the airflow pattern to produce a lower note. Tilting the harmonica also works in changing the airflow pattern, however, changing the shape of the mouth is more effective because the air can flow at an angle.

You should also know these concepts about harmonica like:

  1. Bending and cross harp
    If you are a beginner in playing the harmonica, you should know that it is common for you to have a hard time developing your mouth in its approach to the instrument. But, as long as you pass this phase, you can easily learn techniques in changing pitch. Thus, you can easily do bending notes since it involves changing the shape of the mouth to produce flats and sharps.
  1. From diatonic to octave
    Diatonic, chromatic, tremolo, and octave are the most common types of harmonica. Each of these plays a different range of notes and each has different styles of music it is suited to play.The diatonic harmonica has (mostly) 10 holes and is suited for blues and country music. The chromatic harmonica can have at most 16 holes and is suited for jazz and classical music. Tremolo harmonicas are under the diatonic models and have double holes which is suited for gospel, and international folk styles like Latin and Asian. The octave harmonicas also have double holes but the reeds are one octave apart. This kind of harmonicas is suited in old-time and Irish music.

As you become an expert player of harmonica, you will discover amazing techniques to force the instrument to produce notes beyond what is expected.